Thursday, December 2, 2010

Keck on the Agony of Theological Education

"One reason a modern theological education brings so much agony to the students is that they find the ramparts of faith on which they thought they were standing to be really the ruins of Christendom, and that the gospel actually summons them to a radical kind of faith for which they are scarcely prepared. They are in agony because no one has told them that believing and preaching the gospel in a world without Christendom means literally risking their lives. None of the things they had taken for granted, such as the authority of the Bible, the absoluteness of the gospel, the meaning of Jesus, and the work of the church can be taken for granted today, but must be avowed as decisions of faith. Students are pained because, in our day, learning more about the Bible, theology, Jesus, and the church does not make it easier for them to believe, but actually defines the borderline on which they must be willing to make a commitment in faith." - Leander Keck, Mandate to Witness: Studies in the Book of Acts (Judson Press, 1964), 107.

5 comments:

Isaac Gross said...

Wow, he nailed it!

d. miller said...

In 1964, no less.

Ken Penner said...

Amen.

Jeromey said...

Perhaps of related interest is Stanley Hauerwas's recent First Things article encouraging Christian undergraduate students to uncompromising devotion to Jesus: http://www.firstthings.com/article/2010/10/go-with-god

Joshua said...

Thanks for posting this. I can absolutely identify with what he is saying.